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Anti-submarine patrols

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URL: http://www.crossandcockade.com/forum/forum_posts.asp?TID=222
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Topic: Anti-submarine patrols
Posted By: zac191418
Subject: Anti-submarine patrols
Date Posted: 04 Apr 2010 at 10:42
Hi
I am very interested in anti-submarine patrols.  I am about to go to Hendon to begin research on RAF Westward Ho! and the use of the DH6 and DH9 in this role.
 
Has anyone in the forum a like interest.
 
Best
 
Everett Sharp
Bideford



Replies:
Posted By: NickForder
Date Posted: 06 Apr 2010 at 08:57
Everett
C&CI Journal carried an article on the DH6 which included its use as an anti-submarine aircraft, and wing modification for this role.
 
Peter London's two books (e.g. Aviation in Cornwall - Air Britain) deal with anti-sub ops in the approximate area; also of possible use are :
South Western Approaches : Air Operations in Pembrokeshire by John Tipton
Aircraft versus Submarines, by Alfred Price (is a good overview of the subject, though the WW1 content is limited)
Find and Destroy : Anti-submarine Warfare in WW1
The Air-Britain DH4/9/9A file contains details of aircraft use. 
 
One of the interesting aspects of this is the decision to use pilots graded as not being physically capable of operating on the Western Front.
Nick  


Posted By: NickForder
Date Posted: 06 Apr 2010 at 09:06
DATE SERIAL UNIT NOTES
15.2.1918 ? Egypt ?
31.8.1918 ? 16TDS ?
11.7.1917 A9579 16TS GW1
7.1.1918 A9593 20TS Collision GW1
1.11.1917 A9595 37TS GW1
12.8.1917 A9619 66TS GW1
7.1.1918 A9637 20TS Collision GW1
1.5.1918 A9647 51TS GW1
22.9.1918 A9669 1ShofN&BD GW1
26.1.1918 A9669 53TS GW1
4.6.1918 A9704 5TDS GW1
1.2.1918 A9723 31TS GW1
1.6.1918 A9736 5TDS GW1
12.12.1917 A9744 31TS GW1
20.4.1918 A9751 1TDS GW1
30.5.1918 A9753 46TS Struck by prop GW1
23.12.1917 B2631 1TDS Collision AirCo
23.12.1917 B2656 1TDS Collision AirCo
21.5.1918 B2734 5TS AirCo
31.5.1918 B2753 6TDS AirCo
21.6.1918 B2758 14TS Struck by prop AirCo
27.2.1918 B2763 53TS AirCo
9.7.1918 B2782 202TDS AirCo
19.8.1918 B2787 58TDS AirCo
14.8.1918 B3021 244 Sqn AirCo
18.9.1918 B3023 244 Sqn AirCo
26.7.1918 B3042 8TDS AirCo
13.8.1918 B3058 36TDS AirCo
8.7.1918 B3093 256 Sqn AirCo
22.12.1917 C1953 17TS GW2
10.6.1918 C1969 193TS GW2
10.4.1918 C1971 193TS GW2
4.6.1918 C2028 5TDS GW2
17.9.1918 C2039 193TS GW2
5.11.1918 C2045 18TDS GW2
5.6.1918 C2046 21TS GW2
18.9.1918 C2093 35TDS GW2
11.3.1918 C2135 17TS GW2
24.7.1918 C3506 1TDS Collision 2TDS
6.9.1918 C5172 256 Sqn Kingsbury
19.9.1918 C5174 256 Sqn Kingsbury
6.5.1918 C5508 66TS Harland & Wolff
19.5.1918 C6518 8TDS Morgan & Co
24.7.1918 C6602 1TDS Collision Morgan & Co
9.9.1918 C6635 10TDS Morgan & Co
5.5.1918 C6657 131 Sqn Morgan & Co
10.8.1918 C6841 35TDS Morgan & Co
24.5.1918 C6853 25TS Morgan & Co
7.6.1918 C7251 47TS R, S & J
6.8.1918 C7253 35TDS R, S & J
22.3.1918 C7274 47TS R, S & J
20.7.1918 C7354 12TDS R, S & J
22.3.1918 C7663 13TS GW3
13.6.1918 C7708 191TS GW3
13.9.1918 C7890 242 Sqn GW3
3.8.1918 C9337 37TDS Glos
8.4.1918 C9345 59TS Glos
23.8.1918 F3400 252 Sqn AirCo
A9565 252 Sqn By 8.1918 GW1
A9569 260 Sqn By 5.9.1918 GW1
A9570 Cramlington by 16.4.1918 GW1
A9571 507 Flt By 5.1918 GW1
A9576 13TS GW1
A9579 16TS GW1
A9580 16TS GW1
A9582 17TS GW1
A9588 20TS GW1
A9590 20TS GW1
A9590 50TS GW1
A9591 20TS GW1
A9593 20TS GW1
A9607 53TS GW1
A9611 121 Sqn GW1
A9611 25Ts GW1
A9612 98 Sqn GW1
A9619 66TS GW1
C1972 G-AUDO GW2
C1986 52TS GW2
C1991 5TS AFC GW2
C1992 5TS AFC GW2
C1993 5TS AFC GW2
C1994 5TS AFC GW2
C1994 59TS GW2
C1999 17TS GW2
C2101 G-EAGG GW2
C2136 G-EAQQ GW2


Posted By: NickForder
Date Posted: 06 Apr 2010 at 09:07

DH6 RELATED FATAL CRASHES

DATE

SERIAL

UNIT

NOTES

 

 

MADE BY

 

15.2.1918

?

 

Egypt

 

 

?

 

31.8.1918

?

16TDS

 

 

 

?

 

11.7.1917

A9579

16TS

 

 

 

GW1

 

7.1.1918

A9593

20TS

Collision

 

 

GW1

 

1.11.1917

A9595

37TS

 

 

 

GW1

 

12.8.1917

A9619

66TS

 

 

 

GW1

 

7.1.1918

A9637

20TS

Collision

 

 

GW1

 

1.5.1918

A9647

51TS

 

 

 

GW1

 

22.9.1918

A9669

1ShofN&BD

 

 

GW1

 

26.1.1918

A9669

53TS

 

 

 

GW1

 

4.6.1918

A9704

5TDS

 

 

 

GW1

 

1.2.1918

A9723

31TS

 

 

 

GW1

 

1.6.1918

A9736

5TDS

 

 

 

GW1

 

12.12.1917

A9744

31TS

 

 

 

GW1

 

20.4.1918

A9751

1TDS

 

 

 

GW1

 

30.5.1918

A9753

46TS

Struck by prop

 

GW1

 

23.12.1917

B2631

1TDS

Collision

 

 

AirCo

 

23.12.1917

B2656

1TDS

Collision

 

 

AirCo

 

21.5.1918

B2734

5TS

 

 

 

AirCo

 

31.5.1918

B2753

6TDS

 

 

 

AirCo

 

21.6.1918

B2758

14TS

Struck by prop

 

AirCo

 

27.2.1918

B2763

53TS

 

 

 

AirCo

 

9.7.1918

B2782

202TDS

 

 

 

AirCo

 

19.8.1918

B2787

58TDS

 

 

 

AirCo

 

14.8.1918

B3021

244 Sqn

 

 

 

AirCo

 

18.9.1918

B3023

244 Sqn

 

 

 

AirCo

 

26.7.1918

B3042

8TDS

 

 

 

AirCo

 

13.8.1918

B3058

36TDS

 

 

 

AirCo

 

8.7.1918

B3093

256 Sqn

 

 

 

AirCo

 

22.12.1917

C1953

17TS

 

 

 

GW2

 

10.6.1918

C1969

193TS

 

 

 

GW2

 

10.4.1918

C1971

193TS

 

 

 

GW2

 

4.6.1918

C2028

5TDS

 

 

 

GW2

 

17.9.1918

C2039

193TS

 

 

 

GW2

 

5.11.1918

C2045

18TDS

 

 

 

GW2

 

5.6.1918

C2046

21TS

 

 

 

GW2

 

18.9.1918

C2093

35TDS

 

 

 

GW2

 

11.3.1918

C2135

17TS

 

 

 

GW2

 

24.7.1918

C3506

1TDS

Collision

 

 

2TDS

 

6.9.1918

C5172

256 Sqn

 

 

 

Kingsbury

 

19.9.1918

C5174

256 Sqn

 

 

 

Kingsbury

 

6.5.1918

C5508

66TS

 

 

 

Harland & Wolff

19.5.1918

C6518

8TDS

 

 

 

Morgan & Co

24.7.1918

C6602

1TDS

Collision

 

 

Morgan & Co

9.9.1918

C6635

10TDS

 

 

 

Morgan & Co

5.5.1918

C6657

131 Sqn

 

 

 

Morgan & Co

10.8.1918

C6841

35TDS

 

 

 

Morgan & Co

24.5.1918

C6853

25TS

 

 

 

Morgan & Co

7.6.1918

C7251

47TS

 

 

 

R, S & J

 

6.8.1918

C7253

35TDS

 

 

 

R, S & J

 

22.3.1918

C7274

47TS

 

 

 

R, S & J

 

20.7.1918

C7354

12TDS

 

 

 

R, S & J

 

22.3.1918

C7663

13TS

 

 

 

GW3

 

13.6.1918

C7708

191TS

 

 

 

GW3

 

13.9.1918

C7890

242 Sqn

 

 

 

GW3

 

3.8.1918

C9337

37TDS

 

 

 

Glos

 

8.4.1918

C9345

59TS

 

 

 

Glos

 

23.8.1918

F3400

252 Sqn

 

 

 

AirCo

 

 

KNOWN GRAHAME-WHITE BUILT DH6 AIRCRAFT

DATE

SERIAL

UNIT

NOTES

 

 

BATCH     

 

 

A9565

252 Sqn

By 8.1918

 

 

GW1

 

 

A9569

260 Sqn

By 5.9.1918

 

GW1

 

 

A9570

 

Cramlington by 16.4.1918

GW1

 

 

A9571

507 Flt

By 5.1918

 

 

GW1

 

 

A9576

13TS

 

 

 

GW1

 

 

A9579

16TS

 

 

 

GW1

 

 

A9580

16TS

 

 

 

GW1

 

 

A9582

17TS

 

 

 

GW1

 

 

A9588

20TS

 

 

 

GW1

 

 

A9590

20TS

 

 

 

GW1

 

 

A9590

50TS

 

 

 

GW1

 

 

A9591

20TS

 

 

 

GW1

 

 

A9593

20TS

 

 

 

GW1

 

 

A9607

53TS

 

 

 

GW1

 

 

A9611

121 Sqn

 

 

 

GW1

 

 

A9611

25Ts

 

 

 

GW1

 

 

A9612

98 Sqn

 

 

 

GW1

 

 

A9619

66TS

 

 

 

GW1

 

 

C1972

G-AUDO

 

 

 

GW2

 

 

C1986

52TS

 

 

 

GW2

 

 

C1991

5TS AFC

 

 

 

GW2

 

 

C1992

5TS AFC

 

 

 

GW2

 

 

C1993

5TS AFC

 

 

 

GW2

 

 

C1994

5TS AFC

 

 

 

GW2

 

 

C1994

59TS

 

 

 

GW2

 

 

C1999

17TS

 

 

 

GW2

 

 

C2101

G-EAGG

 

 

 

GW2

 

 

C2136

G-EAQQ

 

 

 

GW2

 



Posted By: zac191418
Date Posted: 06 Apr 2010 at 17:20
Nick
 
Lots here, thanks Clap.  Flying conditions around the shores of the UK would have been extremely hazerdous, so assigning men not fit for the WF idicates, I hazard their inability to function in an oxygen depleted environment (?).
 
Peter Wright's book RFC in Oxfordshire ISBN 0 9510553 0 5 has a great photograph of a DH6 with a nonchalant pilot standing beside his machine...seemingly in the middle of a cornfield...a young lady is seated in the cockpit.  Edvidently once qualified to fly Witney pilots went off to do short local flights in their machines to practice..a popular destination being Gaunt House, the residence of two young sisters'!  One interesting point are the exhaust ports that feed into the normal pipe which seems to flare into a flat stub where it normally (?) went up, or down. 
 
Only one fatality involving the type is recorded: 18.2.1918 at Port Meadow, 'Aircraft dived-in on cross-country'  The location was a training airfield near Wolvercote, Oxford, incidently where I lived until retirement some four weeks ago.
 
Everett
 


Posted By: Grain Kitten
Date Posted: 10 Apr 2010 at 22:16
Everett, In C&C Vol 4 No1 1973 there is a article on the DH6. (It may be the one Nick refers to.) It includes drawing number AD 2016, titled ‘De H6 Bomber –GA Fuselage’ but no references to it in the article text.
I'm interested to know if this drawing is the anti-submarine fit.  The DH6 carried bombs for this role, and didn’t carry a second crew member.  None of my references talk about a bomber version of the DH6 separate from the A-S role.
The drawing shows only the rear seat fitted, triplex glazing in the floor, the bombsight mounting and a sliding shutter in the floor, which slid back along the underside of the fuselage.
If you manage to find out anything aobut the configuration of the aircraft as used in the A-S role I'm very interested, as I'm building a model of one at the moment.
Steve


-------------


Posted By: Adrian Roberts
Date Posted: 11 Apr 2010 at 01:31
Did the DH6s ever actually sink any U-boats?
 
Or, was this not really the intention; was their role more similar to that of the non-rigid airships?  This entailed encouraging the U-boats to stay submerged where they were too slow to catch the convoys, and if they did surface the airship or aeroplane would signal their position to the escorting destroyers


Posted By: zac191418
Date Posted: 12 Apr 2010 at 09:43

Steve

 

The information I have indicates that maritime surveillance flights when a observer was carried on occasions the a/c was armed with a locally mounted Lewis; otherwise in its anti-submarine role as a single seater:  a 100lb or a 65lb or smaller bombs.

 

I do not have any photographic evidence for any of the above...and I assume all the bombs would have been carried on a carrier beneath the pilot...though if you have other information I would be pleased to receive it.

 

If you can I would be interested to see the model, are you making the early or later version with the 10” of ‘back stagger’?

 

 I am an amateur artist and attempting a picture of C2507 from Padstow that engaged a submarine in August 1918.

 

http://www.abergwyngregyn.co.uk/html/body_abers_airfeild.html - http://www.abergwyngregyn.co.uk/html/body_abers_airfeild.html has more information on use...but the photographs could lead to confusion J

 

Everett

 



Posted By: zac191418
Date Posted: 12 Apr 2010 at 09:46

Adrian

 

http://www.abergwyngregyn.co.uk/html/body_abers_airfeild.html - http://www.abergwyngregyn.co.uk/html/body_abers_airfeild.html

 

Has a good history on use (but confusing photographs). See Widsock Datafile 103 which carries a lot of information.  The DH6 did engage enemy submarines and were also involved in calling the RN to the sighting/engagement to continue the attack...sometimes successfully.    In the maritime observation role observers were carried.

 

Everett



Posted By: NickForder
Date Posted: 12 Apr 2010 at 10:32
Westwood Ho !
Westward Ho !, in Devon, opened as an RAF base on 6 June 1918. The units based there were 502 and 503 Special Duty Flights, These formed part of 260 Squadron, 71 Wing, 9 Group. 71 Wing HQ was at Penzance. The function of the flights was anti-submarine work, for which they were equipped with AMC DH6 trainers. These had become surplus after the decision to concentrate on the Avro 504 as a training aircraft, and because of dissatisfaction at the handling of the DH6 which questioned its use as a trainer.
 

The decision to use the DH6 as an anti-submarine aircraft was taken at the beginning of 1918. By March 1918 the RNAS had 137 DH6s on charge for training purposes. Some 300 DH6s became available as they were withdrawn from training units in June 1918, and of these at least 192 were used for anti-submarine work.

In addition to the modifications to the DH6 design, first to make it more suitable for mass production, and then to improve performance, flotation gear was developed and supplied to units. However, there do not appear to be any recorded instances of this gear being fitted on operational aircraft, possibly as a weight saving measure. Although the RAF1A engines DH6s were fairly reliable, the Curtiss OX engine was less so. Inadequate maintenance, and aircraft being parked outside, did not improve reliability and ditching was far from uncommon. Fortunately the DH6 floated well, with estimates of aircraft staying afloat for between 6 and 10 hours being recorded.(See Clutching Hand : The DH6, Ray Vann, Cross & Cockade GB, Volume 4 No 1, 1973).

The intention was to substitute DH4s and DH9s for the DH6s as soon as possible. Although there are notes that DH9s were based at Westward Ho ! with 502 and 503 Flights, it seems more likely that these were aircraft form 494 (Light Bomber) Flight, based at Padstow. Ultimately equipment should be the Blackburn Kangeroo.

Anti-submarine aircraft were to undertake one of four roles :

1.    Routine Patrol – single aircraft

2.    Sweeps – two or more aircraft

3.    Convoy escort – two or more aircraft (usually left to airships and kite balloons operating from ships; DH6s used in this role were flown as two-seaters and communicated by Aldis lamp)

4.    Intensive patrols (to saturate a small area with aerial patrols. This was difficult to maintain, and not particularly effective)

The introduction of the convoy system from the summer of 1917 meant that by “January 1918, sinkings within ten miles of the coast represented 60% of the total losses. To counter these attacks, the Admiralty asked for additional aircraft o patrol stretches of the inshore waters where U-boat activity was particularly intense. As a stopgap, the Air Ministry supplied some 200 surplus DH6 training aircraft which could operate from small coastal landing grounds. Although unable to carry a weight of bombs to sink a U-boat, the DH6s exploited the U-boat commanders’ known fear of aircraft and, simply by their presence, frightened them away from the shipping lanes.” Air Station Aldeburgh 1915-1919, Geoff Dewing

The DH6s were employed on the so-called ‘Operation Scarecrow’ air patrols, passing over an area at 20 minute intervals and thus covering routes used by lone merchantmen between ports and convoy assembly/ dispersal points. The intention was to keep the U-boats submerged to limit their ability to sight targets and force attacks by torpedo.

Areas of particular danger were off the coast of Devon and Cornwall, and between the Tyne and Humber. There were 8 flights of DH6s in the south west area. The intended establishment was :

One Duty Flight

One Stand Off Flight

One Stand By Flight

One Hunting Squadron for each sub area (presumably these were, initially, the bomb carrying DH6s, but were the priority for replacement with the DH4/9 ?)

In theory, each flight consisted of 6 aircraft, but the serviceability of the DH6 was not good. Often there was no hutted accommodation. As late as October 1918 requests for huts were still being made by East Coast based units. The huts had been ordered, but contractors had failed to deliver blaming problems with obtaining materials and adequate skilled labour.  

Trained personnel (pilots, observers & mechanics) were in short supply. Anti-submarine Observer Training Schools were opened, notably at Aldeburgh in Suffolk.  The aircrew were often of medical grades that would have prevented them serving with the BEF, many of them recovering from wounds etc.

In addition, in areas where aircraft would have to defend themselves 13 Flights of DH9s (or other light bombers) were formed.

“In all cases the patrol planes were equipped with radios and carrier pigeons for communications with patrol headquarters. For communication with ships they used flares, message buoys, and the Aldis lamp.” Find and Destroy : Anti-Submarine Warfare in World War 1, Dwight R Messimer

 However, War in the Air notes that only some DH6s were fitted with radio, and communication by Aldis lamp was more usual. 75% of DH6 patrols were flown by pilots alone because the weight of war equipment had such a serious effect on performance, but in the case of radio it may be a case of balancing the extra weight of an observer against the ability for the pilot to multi-task ?

“The Padstow DH6s did not shine. The DH6 was underpowered and carrying  any offensive load was a chore for the aircraft, which was soon given the macabre soubriquet “Clutching Hand”. A maximum bomb load of around 100 lbs was manageable if the pilot flew alone…. The value of the DH6 component of the submarine hunters was not in their offensive power, which was negligible, but in helping dissuade U-boats from pressing home their attacks as remorselessly as they would have had air cover (or at least, the threat of air cover) not been present, and engagements were infrequent…. The DH9s were far more competent machines, of much better construction and reliability… A handful of attacks were made on suspected U-boats, though without clear success.” Aviation in Cornwall, Peter London

Between 1.5.1918 and 11.11.1918 ‘scarecrows’ sighted 16 U-boats and attacked 11. No serious damage was done to any of the U-boats. However, Kapitaenleutnant Hundius, UB103, noted on 2.6.1918 that daylight operations off the Cornish Coast were impossible due to overwhelming air patrols that forced the U-boats under water.

On 5.8.1918 250 Squadron, already consisting of 494, 500 and 501 Flights at Padstow, took over the two flights at Westward Ho !, all remaining in the same wing and Group. 494 (Light Bomber) Flight was equipped with AMC DH9s (e.g. H4284, H4287, B7611, B7612, B7665, C1300, C1301, C1303, D1711, D1712, D1713, C1714, D2963, D2964, D2965, D2966, D2968 & D2969), the other two flights operating the DH6.  Major RE Orton had served as commanding officer of 250 Squadron since 31.5.1918, with FW Merriam as second in command. “Most of my time at Padstow was spent in testing and experimenting with heavier bomb loads and taking pat in patrols, but I also helped with the instructing of several young RFC (sic) officers… Among the first-class pilots at Padstow were Captains Wadham and Talbot-Lehmann, and Lieutenant Scott, AEN Ashford, AH Blundell and VAF Ronaldi, but probably the best remembered man thee was the medical officer, GM Mellor… Another interesting character was our Adjutant, Lieutenant FH Reynolds. He was a popular officer who had earlier been wounded and had lost the use of his left hand. … The terrible influenza epidemic which swept the country soon after the Armistice took its full toll from Padstow. I was one of its victims*… Just before the Armistice I had been recommended to succeed Major Orton as CO of the Squadron. When it came I was transferred almost at once for instructional duty to 29 TS at Croydon.”  First Through the Clouds, FW Merriam

Westward Ho ! suffered a single flying accident fatality. This was to 2Lt Herbert Ceil Kibby, a pilot seconded to the RAF from the 10th Battalion of the Middlesex Regiment. He stalled DH6 C7849 on a turn above the aerodrome and spun in on 4.9.1918. Kibby died of his injuries on 27.10.1918. He was aged 23 and a native of Southall. Kibby is recorded as being a 260 Squadron fatality, with 502 and 503 Flights often being referred to as such even when 250 Squadron had taken over administrative responsibility for them.

The Squadron was disbanded on 2.2.1919.

*Four people are recorded as having died while serving with 250 Squadron. One of these died from pneumonia. It is possible that the other three died of influenza :

58628 AM3 William Henry Brown, aged 19, died of pneumonia 18.8.1918.

252394 Private 1 George Ernest Knight, aged 30, died 22.9.1918. Native of Faversham.

63156 AM2 Roland Paley died 18.8.1918.

249113 Private 2 William James Pratt, aged 18, died 18.8.1918. Native of West Norwood, London

Aircraft serving with 502 & 503 Flights (Ref Aircraft Manufacturing Company, Mick Davis & Royal Navy Aircraft Serials and Units 1911-1919, Ray Sturtivant & Gordon Page ~ latter has plan of Westward Ho 1 also)

Serial

Arrived WH !

Left WH !

Notes

A9659

502/3 Flight 260 Squadron by 21.8.1918

c28.11.1918

RAF 1A engine

C2087

260 Squadron by 8.1918

 

RAF 1A engine. Force landed in sea and sank 3.9.1918. Pilot unhurt. Salved. Force landed after engine failure, Lundy Island, 19.9.1918

C2112

502/3 Flight 260 Squadron by 21.8.1918

c25.10.1918

RAF 1A engine

C6671

502/3 Flight 250 Squadron by 11.10.1918

c14.11.1918

Curtiss OX-5 engine

C6672

250 Squadron by 13.10.1918

c14.11.1918

Curtiss OX-5 engine

C6680

502/3 Flight by 23.7.1918

c8.1918

Curtiss OX-5 engine

C7418

502/3 Flight 250 Squadron by 28.91.1918

 

RAF 1A engine. Force landed and crashed 21.10.1918. Engine failed and force landed in sea 23.10.1918. Pilot unhurt. Pilot and aircraft picked up by convoy

C7419

502/3 Flight 250 Squadron by 27.9.1918

 

RAF 1A engine. Force landed Abbotshaw 14.11.1918. Aircraft and pilot picked up

C7422

502/3 Flight 250 Squadron by 27.10.1918

c13.11.1918

RAF1A engine

C7423

502/3 Flight 250 Squadron by 28.9.1918

c14.11.1918

RAF 1A engine

C7850

502/3 Flight by 23.7.1918

To 500/501 Flt Padstow by 8.1918

OX-5 engine.

Stalled on gliding turn and spun in landing at dusk from anti-submarine patrol 13.8.1918. 2Lt C Waine injured.

C7854

260 Squadron by 18.8.1918

Left c11.1918

OX-5 engine.

C7855

502/3 Flight 260 Squadron by 3.8.1918

Left c11.1918

OX-5 engine. Forced landing 9.8.1918

C2088

260 Squadron by 9.1918

 

RAF 1A engine. Force landed in sea 3.9.1918

C7417

502/3 Flight 250 Squadron by 28.9.1918

 

RAF 1A engine Crashed on beach South Hartland Quay 21.101.1918

C7432

502/3 Flight 250 Squadron by 13.11.1918

 

RAF 1A engine

C7554

502/3 Flight 250 Squadron by 6.1918

To 506 Flt by 19.11.1918

RAF 1A engine

C7848

502/3 Flight 260 Squadron by 13.8.1918

 

Curtiss OX-5 engine. Force landed in sea following engine failure 15.8.1918

C7849

502/3 Flight 260 Squadron by 15.8.1918

 

Curtiss OX-5 engine. Stalled on turn, spun in at Westward Ho ! 4.9.1918. 2Lt HC Kibby died of injuries



Posted By: zac191418
Date Posted: 12 Apr 2010 at 12:29
Nick
 
Thanks for all the information..it certaily shows the value of the flights in the a/s role...it also solves the question as to the fitness of the aircrew. 
 
Everett


Posted By: Grain Kitten
Date Posted: 06 Feb 2012 at 00:06
Sorry it's been so long, other things have got in the way in the last year or so.
The modelling has taken a back seat.
I'm actually building two models, one in each configuration. I found a quote that says the AS aircraft carried the bombs under the wings much as the DH4.


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