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1914-18 Engine oils.

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WrightBrother View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote WrightBrother Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 28 May 2013 at 12:09
The 250hp Rolls-Royce uses Wakefield's Castrol, consumption 6 pints/hour.
The Castor Oil types are Pharmaceutical or Treated.
The mineral oils are Vacuum 'A' or Vacuum 'BB'
 
RFC/Air Board Technical Notes.
Peter Wright.
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whiskymac View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote whiskymac Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 28 May 2013 at 14:36
Presumably this would signify that Castrol was indeed a mix of both castor and mineral oils.

Thanks Peter.
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Paul R Hare View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Paul R Hare Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 28 May 2013 at 16:35
something of a monopoly there as wakefield owned both the "castrol" and "vacuum" brands.
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Paul R Hare View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Paul R Hare Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 28 May 2013 at 19:04
mea culpa!
wakefield didn't own the "vacuum" brand it was an american company; he just marketed the stuff over here.
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MikeMeech View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote MikeMeech Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01 Jun 2013 at 07:19
Hi
In the Cavalry Support Squadron documents from the TNA the lubricating oils carried forward by the Cavalry Division (in a GS Wagon) to resupply the supporting aeroplane in the field are mentioned.  In the June 1916 document it is 'Vacuum B.B. - 12 Gallons and Castor Oil - 8 Gallons'.  There was no 'named' squadron at this time so probably generic for any aeroplane type used for the role, B.E.2 series most likely.
In September 1916 No. 18 Sqn. (FE.2b) is the named squadron, their re-supply is 'Vacuum B.B. - 12 Gallons and Castor Oil - 8 Gallons', so same as previous.
In 1917 the named squadron becomes 35 Sqn. (FK.8), the re-supply now of oil is 'Vacuum B.B. Oil - 3 Gallons and Vacuum A Oil - 1 gallon'.  So a slight change in the oil types for the FK.8 with the replacement of Castor Oil by Vacuum A Oil.
 
I hope that is of use.
Mike
 
 
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whiskymac View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote whiskymac Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01 Jun 2013 at 18:10
This is wonderful! It does seem that the use of castor oil as an additive to the mineral oil was standard practice - at least in the European theatre in the winter months.

The machines that this supply would have been for - BE 2's and FE2b's as pointed out - used in-line V8's and V12's, so the use of mainly mineral oil would have been as I suspected.

Great info, thanks Mike.
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whiskymac View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote whiskymac Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01 Jun 2013 at 18:41
Bingo! Just come across a website - vintagegarage.co.uk - and it would seem that Vacuum 'A' was a winter oil, and 'BB' was the summer oil, at least this is according to a 1928 motoring chart, by which time the trade mark 'Mobiloil' had appeared.
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Ian Burns View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Ian Burns Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01 Jun 2013 at 21:07
The SHELL That Hit Germany Hardest is a paean to Shell fuels.
In the chapters devoted to aviation, just two, there is nary a mention of oil for aero engines.
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Paul R Hare View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Paul R Hare Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 01 Jun 2013 at 21:14
Both vacuum A and vacuum B were made available to competitors at the 1912 Militaryt Aeroplane Competition but then that August was a summer that felt like winter!!
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whiskymac View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote whiskymac Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02 Jun 2013 at 07:20
It's strange isn't it that gasoline should have so much written about it's development over the years, and yet lubricating oil itself seems to be perceived as a much less worthy subject.


Cheers all, Peter.
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