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Morane BB

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    Posted: 16 Jan 2012 at 09:56
I went to the Bolton IPMS show on Sunday, did a bit of C&CI promoting and some judging (a 1/32nd DH2 won best of show !), and came away with a few enquiries to pursue.
 
One of them related to the Morane BB. A slightly odd subject I though, but it seems that there is someone out there attempting to scratchbuilt one. Apart from the fuselage now in the RAFM store at Stafford, can anyone suggest any references; particularly of cockpit details that I can pass on ?
 
Many thanks
Nick
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote NickForder Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 31 Jan 2012 at 08:31

Morane-Saulnier BB

 

Leon Morane formed an aircraft company with fellow Frenchmen Gabriel Borel and Raymond Saulnier in 1910. Borel left the company to set up on his own in October, and the other two partners set up the Societe Anonyme des Aeroplanes Morane-Saulnier. Saulnier had worked with Bleriot on the famous cross-channel Type Onze (XI), and began designing a series of monoplanes.

 

The Type G two-seater and Type H single-seaters went in to production in 1913, and soon established themselves as the monoplanes of choice for racing pilots. The Type H design was be developed by Pfalz in to the E1 fighter, and influence the Fokker Eindecker. Morane-Saulnier produced their own Type N monoplane fighter.

 

The Type G was ordered by the Aviation Militaire, and Claude Grahame White secured a licence to build them at Hendon. The problem with monoplane designs, such as the Type G, was its limited downward view because of the position of the wing. As the primary military use of aircraft was scouting and other reconnaissance, his made the Type G of limited use. The solution, used also by Bleriot, was to produce a parasol variant and so remove the wing from the downward line of sight of the crew.

 

The Morane-Saulnier Type L parasol achieved some notable service, especially when fitted with a forward firing machine gun for Roland Garros and as the mount of Rex Warneford when he won a Victoria Cross for destroying a German airship. Also, it was built under licence by Pfalz.

 

Given the success of the Morane parasols, and the continuing development of the monoplanes, it may seem strange that in the summer of 1915 the company decided to design a conventional biplane to meet a French specification for a two-seater reconnaissance aeroplane.

 

The Aviation Militaire tested the 80 h.p. Le Rhone powered prototype in 1915, under the designation STA MoS.7, but expressed no interest in placing a production order. The response from both the Royal Flying Corps and Royal Naval Air Service was different, possibly because the British aircraft industry was still expanding to meet increased demand. Major DS Lewis DSO, then commanding 3 Squadron RFC equipped with Morane Parasols, was given the opportunity to fly in a BB and gave it a good report. Although it seems likely that Lewis flew in the prototype his report, dated 2 August, 1915, indicates that Morane was considering improving the BB design. The prototype was fitted with wing warping, yet Lewis mentioned specifically that he felt that the BB would be easier to fly when ailerons were fitted. Production aircraft were to be fitted with the 110 h.p. Le Rhone 9J, thus further increasing performance over the 80 h.p. powered Morane Parasols.

 

Meanwhile ‘3683’ was supplied to 4 Squadron RNAS at Dunkerque on 1 October for evaluation. This aircraft had a developed fuselage design, yet retained wing warping.

 

The first RFC example (587) appears to have been test flown for Captain Lord Robert Innes-Ker, of the BASD, on 3 November prior to being delivered to St Omer the next day. This was fitted with the 110 hp engine, and Morane himself impressed Innes-Ker on how good the performance of the BB was. Innes-Ker seemed to have concurred as an order for 92 was placed, for delivery in late 1915.

 

The RFC sought to modify the BB in a number of ways to make it more suitable for operational requirements. The starboard fuselage side fairing was enlarged to house a wireless and a camera mounting was fitted outside the fuselage. A vertical tube gun mounting was fitted behind the cockpit for use by the observer. In service, provision was made for a second Lewis gun to be fitted on the top wing for use by the pilot. It seems that these modifications were made by the RFC at St Omer on the first aircraft which was then flown back to Paris for Morane-Saulnier to use as a pattern aircraft. Morane and Saulnier visited St Omer on 25 November to view the modifications. Possibly as a result of this visit, by 20 February, 1916, it had been decided to fit the wireless and accumulator behind the observer’s seat. Wider ailerons were requested to improve lateral control, but Morane insisted that the tapered design fitted had been chosen as larger ailerons made the aircraft difficult to fly in rough weather. RFC HQ concurred with this view on 16 February, though Morane continued to experiment with revised designs. At least five designs were tried before longer ailerons were suggested, and a modified MS578 was sent to 3 Squadron in July for inconclusive trials. Brigadier General Brooke-Popham suggested fairing strips be fitted over the aileron hinge gaps instead. This seemed to work, and on 24 August, Brooke-Popham instructed Aircraft Depots to fit this modification to all Morane parasols and BBs.

 

With all the modifications, and the ongoing issue of ailerons design, it was not surprising that Morane could commit to the delivery of no more than 26 aircraft by the 31 March, 1915, deadline. The first two had arrived by 9 November, but there were then problems with the engines as Le Rhone announced its intention to stop production of the 110 h.p. Major- General Trenchard, aware of these potential difficulties, instructed Innes-Ker to reduce the order to 36 aircraft on 6 January, 1916, yet 46 were requested for delivery by 31 March, on the following day. Morane delivered only 26 aircraft on time. 36 more aircraft were ordered for delivery by the end of June, and later revised to 24, and 24 more by the end of September.    

 

On 29 January, 1916, it was decided that 1 & 3 Squadrons should each have a flight of four BBs, these to be phased in as they became available and as Morane parasols were struck off charge. In 1,3 and 60 Squadrons the BBs were allocated to B Flight. Despite slow delivery, 3 & 60 Squadrons are known to have had their full complement of BBs on 1 July 1916, whereas 1 Squadron had five. 12 Squadron operated the type also. It was used for Artillery Observation, Contact Patrol and photography work.

 

Duncan Bell-Irving, 60 Squadron, working with his brother Mick, a pilot with 1 Squadron, compiled a list of notes for operating the 110 h.p. Le Rhone efficiently. Bell-Irving developed a new sight for the forward firing Lewis gun on his BB which he demonstrated against a ground target. Major Waldron, 60 Squadron commanding officer, was sufficiently impressed to order similar sights to be fitted to the Squadron’s other BBs.

 

The single RNAS example,3683, served later with 5 Wing at Coudekerque. Non-operational use of the type was made by the No 1 Aircraft Depot Pilot’s School at St Omer, and at the Central Flying School for training. Cecil Lewis recalled a BB being at St Omer, along with other aircraft retained for familiarisation flying by pilots pending posting to squadrons. It was at St Omer that a captured Fokker Eindecker was flown in trials against a Morane N and a BB, both of which Lewis regarded as having superior performance. Only the BE 2c performed worse, though Lewis implied that this may have had something to do with the fact that he was flying it !

 

Deliveries were made weekly and ceased on 14 October, with the delivery of six aircraft, randomly numbered MS816, MS818, MS849, MS852, MS853 and MS854.

These did not go in to service, and their 110 h.p. engines were returned to Morane for installation in Type P Parasols. The airframes, with serials A299-A304, were sent via No 1 Aircraft Depot to England. The fuselage frame of A301 still survives, in the reserve collection of the RAF Museum at Stafford.

 

Serial Number

To Squadron

Left Squadron

Notes

5104

 

 

 

5126

taken on charge by 1 Squadron 6.1.1916

Captain JDG Sanders killed on test flight 2.1.1916

Took off at 9:24 am. Engine failure forced a landing. Hit port wing on telegraph post and caught undercarriage in wires. This caused the Morane to turn over, crushing Sanders.

5130

 

flown to St Omer by Lt WV Strugnell, 1 Squadron, 5.2.1916

 

5137

Delivered to 1AD 27.1.1916, and issued to 3 Squadron on 1.2.1916.

Shot down over Souain by Leutnant Max Immelmann on 23.2.1916.

Pilot, Lieutenant CW Palmer, wounded in foot and taken prisoner, died later of blood posioning , following amputation of foot. Observer, Lieutenant H F Birdwood, killed.

5142

collected from 1 AD St Omer by 1 Squadron 5.2.1916.

Crashed 9.4.1916, Lt SE Parker & Lt  Carruthers

 

5149

 

 

 

5156

 

 

 

5157

From 1 AD to 1 Squadron 15.3.1916.

Crashed on landing by Lt AW Walters 17.6.1916

 

5158

 

 

 

5159

From St Omer to 1 Squadron 6.5.1916.

To 1 AD after engine failure 24.5.1916

 

5160

From 1 AD to 1 Squadron 18.3.1916.

To 1 AD 29.6.1916

 

5161

 

 

 

5162

 

 

 

5163

From St Omer to 1 Squadron 10.4.1916.

To 1 AD damaged by AA fire 19.5.1916

 

5164

From St Omer to 1 Squadron 6.5.1916.

Captain M McB Bell-Irving WIA. To 1 AD 19.6.1916

 

5165

 

 

 

5166

From St Omer to 1 Squadron 19.5.1916.

To 1 AD after crash landing 24.5.1916

 

5167

 

 

60 Squadron. Flown across Channel by Duncan Bell-Irving. Blown over by strong wind while landing

5168

From 1 AD to 1 Squadron 24.5.1916.

Crashed landing by Lt WH Dore 1.8.1916

 

5169

From 1 AD to 1 Squadron 2.8.1916.

Crashed landing 28.11.1916

 

5170

Flown from St Omer to 1 Squadron by Lt SE Parker 24.5.1916.

Crashed 28.7.1916

 

5171

 

 

 

5172

 

 

 

5173

 

 

 

5174

 

 

 

5175

 

 

 

5176

 

 

 

5177

 

 

 

5183

From St Omer to 1 Squadron 30.4.1916.

To 1 AD after crash landing 2.6.1916

 

5184

From 1 AD to 1 Squadron 2.6.1916.

Crashed on landing by Lt CJQ Brand 10.11.1916

 

5185

 

 

 

5192

 

 

 

5193

 

 

 

5200

 

 

 

A119

 

 

 

A132

From 1 AD to 1 Squadron 2.8.1916.

Crashed on aerodrome by Lt DJ MacDonald 5.1.1917

 

A137

From 60 Squadron to 1 Squadron 18.8.1916

 Lt CM Kelly & Lt TGG Sturrock MIA 16.10.1916

 

A138

From 1 AD to 1 Squadron 29.7.1916.

Wrecked on landing by Lt JA Slatter 21.9.1916

 

A139

 

 

 

A147

 

 

 

A149

 

 

 

A150

 

 

 

A151

Flown by Lt TA Oliver from St Omer to 1 Squadron 19.6.1916.

Crashed on landing 27.1.1917

 

A155

From St Omer to 1 Squadron 21.6.1916.

Crashed by Lt JB Fitzsimons 21.7.1916

 

A163

Flown from 1 AD to 1 Squadron by PM Le Gallais 12.11.1916

 

 

A183

 

 

 

A189

From 60 Squadron to 1 Squadron 18.8.1916.

Crashed on landing by Lt GDF Keddie 10.11.1916

 

A190

From 60 Squadron to 1 Squadron 18.8.1916.

To 1 AD 29.1.1917

 

A191

 

 

 

A191

 

 

 

A195

 

 

 

A226

 

To 1 AD from 1 Squadron 29.1.1917

 

A227

 

To 1 AD from 1 Squadron 29.1.1917

 

A230

 

 

 

A231

 

 

 

A232

 

 

 

A233

 

 

 

A242

Flown by Lt CJQ Brand from 1 AD to 1 Squadron 12.11.1916.

To 1 AD 29.1.1917

 

A243

 

 

 

A244

 

 

 

A251

From 1 AD to 1 Squadron 7.1.1917.

Crashed on landing by Lt DJ MacDonald 25.1.1917

 

A256

 

 

 

A257

 

 

 

A282

 

 

 

A283

 

 

 

A284

 

 

 

A286

 

 

 

A287

 

 

 

A288

 

 

 

A289

 

 

 

A290

 

 

 

A293

 

 

 

A294

 

 

 

A295

 

 

 

A296

 

 

 

A299

 

 

Engine returned to Morane-Saulnier. Airframe to England via 1 AD

A300

 

 

Engine returned to Morane-Saulnier. Airframe to England via 1 AD

A301

 

 

Engine returned to Morane-Saulnier. Airframe to England via 1 AD. Fuselage frame with RAF Museum

A302

 

 

Engine returned to Morane-Saulnier. Airframe to England via 1 AD

A303

 

 

Engine returned to Morane-Saulnier. Airframe to England via 1 AD

A304

 

 

Engine returned to Morane-Saulnier. Airframe to England via 1 AD

 

5104, 5126, 5130, 5137, 5142, 5149, 5156, 5157, 5158, 5159, 5160, 5161, 5162, 5163, 5164, 5165, 5166, 5167, 5168, 5169, 5170, 5171, 5172, 5173, 5174, 5175, 5176, 5177, 5181, 5182, 5183, 5184, 5185, 5192, 5193, 5200, A119, A132, A137, A138, A139, A147, A149, A150, A151, A155, A161, A163, A183, A189, A190, A191, A195, A217, A218, A220, A222, A226, A227, A230, A231, A232, A233, A242, A243, A244, A251, A256, A257, A282, A283, A284, A286, A287, A288, A289, A290, A293, A294, A295, A296, A299, A300, A301, A302, A303, A304

 

Other customers for the Type BB were the Russians and the Spanish. The Russians built a single example under licence at Dux in 1917, supposedly armed with two synchronized Vickers machine guns. The Compania Espanola Construcciones Aeronauticas acquired a licence in 1915 to build the BB. These were powered by 150 h.p. Hispano-Suiza 8A engines, with radiators mounted on the fuselage sides. The prototype first flew, at Albericia, in January 1916. Twelve production aircraft were ordered for the Aeronautica Militaire but they proved difficult to operate and were placed in storage in 1918. A development aircraft was produced in 1918 but was not ordered.

 

“This Morane biplane was engine with a 110 h.p. Le Rhone. The wings, which were of the deeply cambered Morane type, had no dihedral, and the machine was very ugly to look at, but for those days it had a very good turn of speed and climb.”

James McCudden

 

“Number Three Squadron on the Somme was equipped with two flights of Morane Parasols and one flight of Biplanes. While the Biplane was unmistakably from the same stable as the Parasol, in a curious way the design had not come off. The Biplane had a 110 h.p. Le Rhone engine – not so sweet as the 80 h.p. engines in the Parasols which ran like sewing machines – and out admiration f the Biplane as chiefly because it was, for those days, quite fast. It flew at 95 m.p.h., which was 10 m.p.h. faster than the Parasol.”

 

“Both in the air and on the ground this aeroplane had a somewhat waspish appearance. It looked dangerous and short-tempered and, though I cannot support this with any figures, I have a feeling that the extra speed made it pretty well invulnerable to enemy attack in the air. I do not remember any casualties in the Biplane flight. The aircraft had the same undercarriage and the same extraordinary tail as the Parasol. For artillery observation it was less satisfactory than the Parasol because the lower wings which inevitably impeded the pilot’s downward view.”

Cecil Lewis.

 

“It was draughty and cold to sit in, but was light on the controls and ad a reasonable good performance. This machine was also a two-seater, like the parasol, with the observer’s seat behind the pilot’s”

AJL Scott

 

Span : 8.585m
length : 6.935 m (at 3,050 m) : 134 km/h

Climb to 1,980 m : 13 minutes

Climb to 3,050 m : 26 minutes 48 seconds

Service Ceiling : 3,660 m

Height : 2.165 m

Wing Area : 22.32 square metres

Weight : 491kg (empty), 761 kg (loaded)

Maximum Speed (3,050 m) : 134 km/h

 

Sources :

Farewell to Wings, Cecil Lewis

Aeroplanes of the Royal Flying Corps (Military Wing), JM Bruce

Under the Guns of The German Aces, Norman Frank & Hal Giblin

Number One in War and Peace : The History of No 1 Squadron 1912-2000, Norman Franks & Mike O’Connor

Sagittarius Rising, Cecil Lewis

French Aircraft of the First World War, James J Davilla & Arthur M Soltan

60 Squadron, RAF, 1916-1919, AJL Scott

Gentleman Air Ace : The Duncan Bell Irving Story, Elizabeth O’Kiely

Five Years in the RFC, James McCudden

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote NickForder Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 21 Feb 2012 at 12:54
I'm now looking at RFC operational use of the Morane BB.
I have a fair amount of information on 1 & 60 Squadrons, but very little on 3 Squadron use.
4 Squadron are supposed to have operated BBs but, as I can find no information on this, I do wonder if this may be confusion with the single RNAS example that went to 4(N) ?
The 12 Squadron aircraft may have been attached from the Pilots' Training School at St Omer (who had at least one BB, and probably had a succession of repaired aircraft waiting to return to their units) and used briefly while the unit was equipping with the BE2c. 
Can anyone help, please ?
One of the issues is determining when a two-seater Morane is a BB and not a Parasol which makes me think that perhaps I should look at Parasols also .....
Thanks
Nick
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote NickForder Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17 May 2012 at 08:44

Canadian Roderick Ward Maclennan flew a BB at CFS in October 1917 : “I seem to have finished with my beloved Avros and am flying a Morane biplane. It is not so steady as an Avro and it will not fly alone. We fly them to perfect ourselves in making landings, as the Morane’s probably the hardest machine to land properly. I have been flying them a week now and seem to have done pretty well. I broke an axle in landing on Thursday but that was a mere nothing. Aside from the difficult landing, they are beautiful machines to fly and they have a lovely engine. They are small and in the air resemble a fish more than a bird. Yesterday I was up in one for an hour and 30 minutes and during my wanderings about the country went down over Salisbury and from a height of about a mile, viewed the old town and its huge cathedral, set in a beautiful green garden.”

The Ideals and Training of a Flying Officer

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote KK Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 20 May 2012 at 08:50
Why would the last 6[at least] engines be returned to the Morane-Saulnier factory?
Were they not the property of the RFC and worth using to power something else?
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote NickForder Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 22 May 2012 at 09:42
The 110 h.p. engines were returned to Morane for fitting in to Type P Parasols which I assume were on order for the RFC ?
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote NickForder Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09 Jul 2012 at 08:37
Serial Number

C/n

To Squadron

Left Squadron

Notes

3683

 

Delivered to 3 Squadron, 1 Wing, RNAS, by 1.10.1915

Deleted Dunkerque 22.6.1916

Fitted with wing warping.

5104

 

 

 

 

5122

 

 

 

 

5126

 

Taken on charge by 1 Squadron 6.1.1916. It is unclear if 5126 was repaired and returned to 1 Squadron on this date, or whether it was officially taken on charge after being written off  by Sanders.

Crashed on 2.1.1916.

1 Squadron

5130

 

 

Flown to 1AD, St Omer, by Lt WV Strugnell, 1 Squadron, 5.2.1916

1 Squadron

5133

533

 

 

Noted also as LA Parasol

5136

547

 

 

 

5137

 

Delivered to 1AD 27.1.1916, and issued to 3 Squadron on 1.2.1916.

Shot down on 23.2.1916.

3 Squadron

 

5142

 

Collected from 1 AD St Omer by 1 Squadron 5.2.1916.

Crashed 9.4.1916, Lt SE Parker & Lt  Carruthers

1 Squadron

5149

 

 

 

 

5156

581

 

 

 

5157

584

From 1 AD to 1 Squadron 15.3.1916.

Crashed on landing by Lt AW Walters 17.6.1916

1 Squadron

5158

597

 

To 3 Squadron by 8.11.1916

3 Squadron, A Flight

Some sources notes this as a Parasol

5159

 

From St Omer to 1 Squadron 6.5.1916.

To 1 AD, St Omer, after engine failure 24.5.1916

1 Squadron

5160

 

From 1 AD to 1 Squadron 18.3.1916.

To 1 AD 29.6.1916

1 Squadron

5161

586

To 3 Squadron by 8.11.1916

 

3 Squadron, A Flight

Some sources notes this as a Parasol

5162

578

 

Shot up and forced to land on  60 Squadron  reconnaissance 30.7.1916

60 Squadron

5163

591

From St Omer to 1 Squadron 10.4.1916.

To 1 AD, St Omer, after being  damaged by AA fire on 19.5.1916

1 Squadron

5164

592

From St Omer to 1 Squadron 6.5.1916.

To 1 AD, St Omer, on 19.6.1916

1 Squadron

5165

589

To 3 Squadron by 31.5.1916

 

3 Squadron, A Flight

Some sources notes this as a Parasol

5166

590

From St Omer to 1 Squadron 19.5.1916.

To 1 AD, St Omer, after crash landing 24.5.1916

1 Squadron

5167

583

Delivered to 1AD on 16.3.1916.

To 60 Squadron 19.5.1916

Crashed 24.6.1916 and returned to 1AD

60 Squadron

Noted as crashed on landing and turned over by Lieutenant AD Bell-Irving at Boisdingem, 60 Squadron in, June 1916, but this was 5177.

5168

596

From 1 AD to 1 Squadron 24.5.1916.

Crashed landing by Lt WH Dore 1.8.1916

1 Squadron

5169

595

From 1 AD to 1 Squadron 2.8.1916.

Crashed landing 28.11.1916

1 Squadron

5170

594

Flown from St Omer to 1 Squadron by Lt SE Parker 24.5.1916.

Crashed 28.7.1916

1 Squadron

5171

 

 

 

5171 recorded also as Nieuport 16 c/n 9154 ?

5172

 

 

 

5172 recorded also as Nieuport 16 c/n 9155 ?

5173

 

 

 

5173 recorded also as Nieuport 16 c/n 9158 ?

5174

 

 

 

5174 recorded also as Morane LA 673 ?

5175

 

 

 

5175 recorded also as Morane LA 674 ?

5176

 

 

 

60 Squadron

5177

 

 

 

Failed to return from 60 Squadron patrol on 2.8.1916

Crashed on landing and turned over by Lieutenant AD Bell-Irving at Boisdingem, 60 Squadron, June 1916. Noted as 5167 also, but photo confirms serial.

5181

600

 

Failed to return from 60 Squadron  patrol on 2.8.1916

60 Squadron

5182

599

 

 

60 Squadron

5183

582

From St Omer to 1 Squadron 30.4.1916.

To 1 AD, St Omer,  after crash landing 2.6.1916

1 Squadron

5184

593

From 1 AD to 1 Squadron 2.6.1916.

Crashed on landing by Lt CJQ Brand 10.11.1916

1 Squadron

5185

607

 

 

 

5192

604

 

 

 

5193

606

 

Failed to return from 60 Squadron  reconnaissance on 30.7.1916

60 Squadron

5200

605

 

 

3 Squadron

Some sources notes this as a Parasol

A119

609

To 3 Squadron by 8.11.1916

 

3 Squadron, A Flight

Some sources notes this as a Parasol

A132

585

From 1 AD to 1 Squadron 2.8.1916.

Crashed on aerodrome by Lt DJ MacDonald 5.1.1917

1 Squadron

A137

610

From 60 Squadron to 1 Squadron 18.8.1916

Failed to return from 1 Squadron reconnaissance escort sortie on 16.10.1916

1 Squadron

A138

614

From 1 AD to 1 Squadron 29.7.1916.

Wrecked on landing by Lt JA Slatter 21.9.1916

1 Squadron

A139

612

 

 

 

A147

617

 

 

 

A149

588

 

Shot up 26.7.1916 and sent to 2AD for repair

60 Squadron

A150

613

 

 

 

A151

 

Flown by Lt TA Oliver from St Omer to 1 Squadron 19.6.1916.

Crashed on landing 27.1.1917

1 Squadron

A155

 

From St Omer to 1 Squadron 21.6.1916.

Crashed by Lt JB Fitzsimons 21.7.1916

1 Squadron

A161

 

 

 

 

A162

 

 

 

 

A163

 

Flown from 1 AD to 1 Squadron by PM Le Gallais 12.11.1916

 

1 Squadron

A183

 

To 3 Squadron by 8.11.1916

 

3 Squadron, A Flight

Some sources notes this as a Parasol

A189

 

From 60 Squadron to 1 Squadron 18.8.1916.

Crashed on landing by Lt GDF Keddie 10.11.1916

1 Squadron

60 Squadron

A190

 

From 60 Squadron to 1 Squadron 18.8.1916.

To 1 AD, St Omer, 29.1.1917

1 Squadron

A191

 

To 3 Squadron by 8.11.1916

 

3 Squadron, A Flight

Some sources notes this as a Parasol

A195

578

To 3 Squadron by 23.7.1916

 

3 Squadron

Fitted with larger aileron for better lateral control

A217

 

 

 

 

A218

 

 

 

 

A220

 

 

 

 

A222

 

 

 

 

A226

804

 

To 1 AD, St Omer, from 1 Squadron 29.1.1917

1 Squadron

A227

803

 

To 1 AD, St Omer, from 1 Squadron 29.1.1917

1 Squadron

A230

807

 

 

 

A231

 

 

 

 

A232

 

 

 

 

A233

 

 

 

 

A242

 

Flown by Lt CJQ Brand from 1 AD, St Omer, to 1 Squadron 12.11.1916.

To 1 AD, St Omer, 29.1.1917

1 Squadron

A243

 

 

 

 

A244

 

 

 

 

A251

808

From 1 AD, St Omer, to 1 Squadron 7.1.1917.

Crashed on landing by Lt DJ MacDonald 25.1.1917

1 Squadron

A256

802

 

 

 

A257

810

 

 

 

A282

 

 

 

 

A283

 

 

 

34 Training Squadron

A284

 

 

 

 

A286

845

 

 

 

A287

814

 

 

 

A288

806

 

 

 

A289

846

 

 

 

A290

812

 

 

 

A293

847

 

 

 

A294

815

 

 

 

A295

851

 

 

 

A296

850

 

 

 

A299

818

 

 

Engine returned to Morane-Saulnier. Airframe to England via 1 AD, St Omer

A300

853

 

 

Engine returned to Morane-Saulnier. Airframe to England via 1 AD, St Omer

A301

816

 

 

Engine returned to Morane-Saulnier. Airframe to England via 1 AD, St Omer.

A302

849

 

 

Engine returned to Morane-Saulnier. Airframe to England via 1 AD, St Omer

A303

854

 

 

Engine returned to Morane-Saulnier. Airframe to England via 1 AD, St Omer

A304

852

 

 

Engine returned to Morane-Saulnier. Airframe to England via 1 AD, St Omer

Update on Morane BB serials in red. Still a lot of question marks, and I have yet to indentify the one (or more) BB(s) with 12 Squadron in February 1916.

The Hugh Anselm Boulter Robb, MC, article by Donald R Neate, Cross & Cockade Great Britain Journal, Volume 10, Number 4, 1979, list a number of A Flight, 3 Squadron, Morane Parasols which are, in fact, BBs; as noted above. 

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NickForder View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote NickForder Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 09 Jul 2012 at 08:42
Does anyone know of Portal's (i.e. Marshal of the Royal Air Force Charles Frederick Algernon Portal, 1st Viscount Portal of Hungerford KG GCB OM DSO & Bar MC (21 May 1893 – 22 April 1971) WW1 service ?
 
I know that he was in 60 Squadron, and I would like to confirm whetehr or not he flew BBs.. 
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NickForder View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote NickForder Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 17 Jul 2012 at 09:43
I'm now looking for photos of Morane BBs ~ can anyone help ?
Thanks
Nick
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote EnglishGent Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18 Jul 2012 at 04:10

Nick,

You probably all ready looked there but here are two photos in C&C  Vol.13, Vol.20.

Morane BB  #3683 crashed photo C&C 13.118

Morane BB  photo C&C 20.067

For it’s worth, Derek

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