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James Valentine 2

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“On Saturday morning… (at Brooklands) Valentine made several flights on a new Gnome Bristol monoplane for testing purposes.” (Flight 18.5.1912)

On Saturday “at 5 o’clock the speed handicap started (at the Hendon Summer Meeting). This was held in two heats of 12 laps each and a final. Valentine (Bristol monoplane) and Hucks (Bleriot) were in the first heat, and Turner (Howard Wright) and Ewen (Caudron biplane) in the second. Hucks gave Valentine 34 seconds start and Ewen conceded Turner 8 minutes 25 seconds. Valentine came down before he reached the second pylon owing to engine trouble, so the first heat was a walkover for Hucks.” (Flight, 25 May, 1912)

 

On the first day of the Second London Aviation Meeting at Hendon, at Whitsun, there were problems due to the gusty weather. Things improved in the afternoon and “Valentine… tested the engine of his Bristol monoplane, and then made a flight of about three minutes…. The first event was the cross-country handicap to Elstree and back – once only, owing to the nasty wind – in which there were three starters. These were Turner (Howard Wright biplane No 10), Valentine (Bristol monoplane No 14) and Hamel with Miss Davies (Bleriot monoplane No3). Hamel was scratch, giving Turner 6 minutes and 3 second, and Valentine 1 minute and 42 seconds. Valentine won this event by 6 seconds, Turner being seconds… The next event was the altitude contest, which started about 6 o’clock. Hamel, with Miss Davies, and Valentine were the only two entrants, the latter retiring after he had been up only a few minutes, his height not being recorded… The final event was the speed handicap…. The event was held in two heats of four laps each and a final of six laps. Turner on the Howard Wright biplane, with 1 minute and 34 seconds start, and Ewen on the Caudron biplane flew the first heat. Valentine on the Bristol monoplane, 35 seconds start, and Hamel with Miss Davies on the Bleriot were in the second. Turner won the first heat and Valentine the second. Hamel, seeing that he could not finish first, cut across the ground and crossed the line considerably in advance of Valentine, much to the puzzlement of the spectators, some of them thinking he had won. In the final, Valentine, who gave Turner 3 minutes and 47 seconds start, finished 18 seconds ahead of the latter.”(Flight 1.6.1912)

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“On Thursday (18 April) afternoon Valentine made a trip on his two-seater Bristol monoplane in a strong wind, no one else venturing out. Friday was a much better day and a number of machines were in evidence. … Sopwith was also out carrying passengers, amongst them Mrs Locke King and Valentine. … During the afternoon Valentine took Sopwith over to Hendon on the Bristol monoplane. Sopwith then flew his 70 hp Bleriot back to Brooklands with Hucks as a passenger. Valentine also started on the Bristol, but when over Hounslow Heath felt unwell, so landed near the barracks where he left his machine under a police guard for the night. Next morning he flew back to Brooklands.”  (Flight 20.4.1912)

 

“Valentine, on his 50 hp Bristol two-seater monoplane, arrived (at Hendon) during the morning ( 20 April) at half-past eleven, bringing with him Mr Ronald Chateris as passenger.” (Flight 27.4.1912)

 

“Valentine had started off in his Bristol monoplane, and was circling overhead at about 1,000 feet. …The cross-country event, twice over the course from the aerodrome to harrow spire and back, commenced at five o’clock. First away was Lewis Turner on the Farman…. Six minutes and 45 seconds behind him started Ewen on his Caudron, being given only 2 minutes 30 seconds by Hucks on the Gnome-Bleriot. Valentine on the Bristol monoplane started two minutes later, with Hamel just under a minute behind him. “Turner retired early with engine trouble. “Hucks, Valentine and Hamel rounded the home mark shortly afterwards and disappeared again, flying strongly. Returning for the second time, Hucks was the first to come in sight, flying well at a good thousand feet. He planed down and crossed the line amid cheers. Valentine then appeared.” For the speed contest “ Hucks, Valentine and Hamel were the contestants, Hamel being scratch, and giving 37 seconds to Valentine and 65 seconds to Hucks. Of the starts, Valentine’s was by far the neatest, incidentally bringing out a hitherto unrecognized quality in the Bristol monoplance. He had no mechanics to hold him back, he simply threw his cloche forward, raising the tail, so that his front skids rested on the earth to effectively brake the machine. Receiving the signal to start, he merely lowered the tail by a movement of the elevator, and sped off. Both Hucks and Valentine flew fairly high. … (Hamel’s) engine was not pulling as well as it might, and despite all his clever handling, he could not reduce the distance that separated him from valentine. The latter slowly, but surely, gained on Hucks and, speeding up the straight in finishing the last circuit, drew level and passed him scarcely 300 yards from the finishing line. It was cleverly done on Valentine’s part, but it cost him the race, for he was disqualified for passing Hucks on the inside. Hucks crossed the line 5 seconds after Valentine, with Hamel 11 seconds behind.” (Flight 27.4.1912)  Valentine won the second prize of 10 sovereigns in the Cross –Country Handicap, and missed out on 25 sovereigns in the Speed handicap due to the disqualification.

Valentine was back at Hendon the following week (27 April) to take part in the Cross-Country Handicap in the Bristol monoplane with racing number ‘14’.

 

“Hamel was at scratch, and allowed Hucks twenty six seconds and Valentine thirteen seconds, but by the time the machines were clear of the aerodrome, Hamel had already obtained the lead. All the machines were started at right angles to the direction to be taken, and so had to a make a left turn when in the air. Both Hucks and Valentine took this turn arther widely, but Hamel scored heavily by cutting round sharply as soon as his machinme was off the ground. Hamel was the first to complete the ten miles, and his time was 11 minutes and 39 seconds, Valentine being second in 12 minutes and 5 ½ seconds, and Hucks third” (Flight 4.5.1912) in just over 12 minutes and 28 seconds.”

 

 “A wireless telegraphy station has just been fitted up at Hendon by Messers. AW Gamage Ltd. A transmitter was fitted on Mr Valentine’s monoplane, while a receiving station has been installed at that flyer’s hangar. We understand that Mr Valentine successfully transmitted some message while in flight on Sunday inst (28 April).” (Flight 4.5.1912)

 

 “Valentine flew over (to Brooklands) from Hendon on the Bristol monoplane, taking nearly an hour against the strong head wind.” (Flight 11.5.1912). He landed in the late afternoon.

 

On Friday, 10 May, “Spencer, Valentine and Moorhouse were all out, Valentine flying round about 40 feet over the track, to time the machine over measured distances.” (Flight 11.5.1912).

 

On 11 May, “Some expectation was aroused by the announcement from the Judge’s box that Mr Valentine and Mr Moorhouse had started from Brooklands and would take part in the speed handicap on their arrival. It was not until 6:25 pm, however, that Valentine arrived on the Bristol monoplane having covered the distance of 20 miles in 18 minutes. Mr Moorhouse did not start. Just before the start of the speed handicap, Mr Crashaw got away on his Bleriot monoplane for a cross-country flight, employing an automatic self-starter. The speed contest was to be held in two heats and a final of three laps each, Hamel (Bleriot) and Ewen (Caudron biplane) being in the first, and Hucks (Bleriot) and Valentine (Bristol) in the second. In the first heat Ewen kept ahead of Hamel until the last lap, when the latter passed him at the last pylon, and crossed the winning post nine seconds ahead of Ewen. ..  The second heat was a walkover for Valentine, as Hucks ‘fouled’ Pylon No 5 on the first lap and failed to return and pass the pylon properly.” (Flight 18.5.1912) In the final Hamel collided with a parked Nieuport on take-off, and the crowd rushed on to the course to see better. Just then Crawshaw arrived over Hendon, back from his cross-country race, and had problems identifying somewhere to land.  The race was then called off.

 

“On Saturday morning (11 May)… (at Brooklands) Valentine made several flights on a new Gnome Bristol monoplane for testing purposes.” (Flight 18.5.1912)

 

On Saturday, 18 May, “at 5 o’clock the speed handicap started (at the Hendon Summer Meeting). This was held in two heats of 12 laps each and a final. Valentine (Bristol monoplane) and Hucks (Bleriot) were in the first heat, and Turner (Howard Wright) and Ewen (Caudron biplane) in the second. Hucks gave Valentine 34 seconds start and Ewen conceded Turner 8 minutes 25 seconds. Valentine came down before he reached the second pylon owing to engine trouble, so the first heat was a walkover for Hucks.” (Flight, 25 May, 1912)

On the first day of the Second London Aviation Meeting at Hendon, at Whitsun, on 25 May, there were problems due to the gusty weather. Things improved in the afternoon and “Valentine… tested the engine of his Bristol monoplane, and then made a flight of about three minutes…. The first event was the cross-country handicap to Elstree and back – once only, owing to the nasty wind – in which there were three starters. These were Turner (Howard Wright biplane No 10), Valentine (Bristol monoplane No 14) and Hamel with Miss Davies (Bleriot monoplane No3). Hamel was scratch, giving Turner 6 minutes and 3 second, and Valentine 1 minute and 42 seconds. Valentine won this event by 6 seconds, Turner being seconds… The next event was the altitude contest, which started about 6 o’clock. Hamel, with Miss Davies, and Valentine were the only two entrants, the latter retiring after he had been up only a few minutes, his height not being recorded… The final event was the speed handicap…. The event was held in two heats of four laps each and a final of six laps. Turner on the Howard Wright biplane, with 1 minute and 34 seconds start, and Ewen on the Caudron biplane flew the first heat. Valentine on the Bristol monoplane, 35 seconds start, and Hamel with Miss Davies on the Bleriot were in the second. Turner won the first heat and Valentine the second. Hamel, seeing that he could not finish first, cut across the ground and crossed the line considerably in advance of Valentine, much to the puzzlement of the spectators, some of them thinking he had won. In the final, Valentine, who gave Turner 3 minutes and 47 seconds start, finished 18 seconds ahead of the latter.”(Flight 1.6.1912)

 

“The next race was the speed handicap…. There were three starters : Turner (Howard Wright biplane), Ewen (Caudron biplane) an Valentine (Bristol monoplane). The machines were started against the wind and had to round pylon No 5 before starting the circuits. Turner was first off and Ewen followed, Valentine starting nearly a lap behind Turner. Whilst Ewen was doing his last lap and just as he was coming to pylon No 4, a side gust of wind struck him badly and tilted the machine over. Then, apparently through the wing tip striking the ground – he was flying very low – the biplane turned completely over. Ewen was thrown clean through one of the lanes, head first… Valentine, on seeing him fall, came down to him immediately and was one of the first to assist him.

At 5 o’clock the cross-country handicap was started. The course this time was to St Albans and back, twice, a distance of about 44 miles. There were three starters : Turner (Howard Wright biplane), Valentine (Bristol monoplane) and Hucks (Bleriot monoplane)… Turner was first off with 23 ½ minutes start. Valentine next, 1 ½ minutes ahead of Hucks. Turner was seen returning after he had been away about half an hour (having decided to retire with engine problems) …. Soon after Valentine was sighted, with Hucks high up behind him, apparently losing ‘air’.... Valentine was the first home as was expected, his time being 52 minutes 20 seconds. Hucks took 54 minutes 9 seconds – not so far behind.” (Flight 1.6.1912) 

 

“The last item on the programme – the speed handicap – was then gone through. There were five entries for this event : Sabelli (Deperdussin), Hucks (Bleriot),Turner (Howard Wright), Cody (Cody) and Valentine (Bristol).”  Valentine was in the second heat, as scratch, giving 2 minutes and 53 seconds to Turner and 1 minute 55 seconds to Cody. Cody won this heat, by 32 seconds, and Valentine was third.” (Flight 1.6.1912)

 

At the Bristol School on Salisbury Plain on Thursday (30 May), “Mr Valentine made several fine flights on one of the Bristol military two-seater monoplanes. By this time the wind was blowing at fully 25 mph, and further flying was abandoned. A tricky wind was still blowing Friday. The Bristol staff were out at an early hour, and all the pupils were given tuition flights, but no pupils’ solo flying was allowed.” (Flight 1.6.1912)    

 

Valentine was one of the fifteen pilots who entered for the first London Aerial Derby on Satuday 8 June, 1912. “A delay ensued before the starting of the event… , Sippe, the first competitor, was not signalled to leave until 4:38. As the machines were being brought up to the starting line a hush of supressed excitement fell over the masses of onlookers… A wave of the flag and he was off. T one minute intervals followed Sopwith on his 70hp two-seater Bleriot, Hamel on an almost identical machine, Verrier on the Aircraft Company’s 70 hp Maurice Farman biplane, Moorhouse on his 50 hp Radey-Moorhouse, Maur ice Guillaux on a 45 hp Anzani-Caudron monoplane and Valentine on his 50 hp Bristol.” (Flight 15.6.1912)

 

“The official times for the course of 81 miles were :

TOM Sopwith (70 hp Gnome-Bleriot monoplane) – 1 hour 23 minutes 8 2/5 seconds (Disqualified)

1.    GW Hamel (70 hp Gnome-Bleriot monoplane) 1 hour 38 minutes 4 seconds

2.    W Moorhouse (50 hp RM monoplane) 2 hours 22 seconds

3.    J Valentine (50 hp Gnome-Bristol monoplane) 2 hours 26 minutes 36 seconds

(Flight 15.6.1912)

 

“Since the appearance of our paragraph relating to the Isaacson engine last week, it has been given a practical trial on Mr James Valentine’s Bristol monoplane at Hendon. Although the weather was too rough on Saturday last (15 June) to test it under flying conditions, the static thrust was taken and found to be 500 lbs. It will be good to bear in mind that one of the best French engines rated at 50 hp gives on average a thrust under similar conditions of something in the neighbourhood of 360 lbs.” (Flight 22.6.1912).

 

Valentine stopped off at Dover, on Wednesday 24 June, en route to the motor Grand Prix. Captain Dunne showed him the Dunne monoplane, “while demonstrating the machine the engine started to give trouble, and he was obliged to land down wind, with rather serious consequences to all except Captain Dunne and the Gnome engine, both of which came out untouched.” (Flight 29.6.1912)

“Valentine arrived (at Dover aerodrome) on the 24th (Monday 24 June) late in the evening on his way to Dieppe, and stayed the night.” (Flight 29.6.1912)

 

At the Second Summer Meeting at Hendon (22 June) “at about five o’clock the machines were lined up for the cross-country handicap, which event, however, did not go through in a very satisfactory manner. Although thee were four starters : Verrier (Maurice Farman), Valentine (Bristol), Hamel (Bleriot single-seater), and Hucks (Bleriot two-seater), they all missed the mark at Elstree owing to the haze caused by the heat.” Also there were problems as two balloons taking part in a long distance challenge cup from Hurlingham were seen to be approaching the course. “Hucks, Hamel and Valentine were seen returning” but Hamel gave up as soon as he saw the balloons. “At first it was intended to hold another cross-country race, but finally the management decided to divide the prize money amongst the four competitors.” (Flight 29.6.1912) 

 

“Valentine left (Eastchurch) for Dieppe at 7:10 pm (Wednesday 3 July), on his Bristol monoplane (two-seater) finding it unfavourable for cross-Channel flying, he stopped at the Dover Aerodrome until the following day.” (Flight 6.7.1912)

“On the afternoon of the 4th inst.(Thursday 4 July), Mr Valentine on his Deperdussin monoplane flew across from Dover to Wissant in 35 minutes and later flew back to London. The next day he flew from London to Abbeville and continued his journey the following morning at Issy.” (Flight 13.7.1912)

 

The Military Aeroplane Competitions :

British and Colonial Aeroplane Company Limited Type M tandem monoplane

Length : 28 feet 4inches; Span : 40 feet 3 inches; Area : 242 square feet; Speed : 70 mph; Weight : 792 lbs; Useful Load : 600 lbs; Undercarriage : wheels & skids; Controlling surfaces : warping & rear elevators; Motor : 80 hp 7-cylinder direct drive Gnome (Bore & Stroke :124 x 140); Pilot : James Valentine (Flight 3.8.1912)

 

On Monday (29 July) evening, at the Bristol School on Salisbury Plain, Valentine was up in one of the Bristol monoplanes flying within the confines of the aerodrome. (Flight 3.8.1912)

 

On 1 August, Valentine made a flight “on another Bristol monoplane. This pilot had a remarkable piece of bad luck. When up at some eight his engine failed, so he came down en vol plane. When nearing the ground he found that he would with difficulty clear a fence in front, so made machine come down at a slightly flatter angle that its normal gliding angle. The result was a pancake which converted itself into a side-slip, and the machine struck the ground with the left-hand wing, its nose being severely damaged. Fortunately the pilot was unhurt.” (Flight 12.8.1912)

 

Flight, on 17 August, reported that the previous Tuesday (13 August) Pixton had been transferred to fly the Bristol monoplane as Valentine had departed. (Flight 17.8.1912). It had taken four days to repair the Bristol after Valentine’s crash.

Valentine was at the next Hendon meeting, that Saturday (17 August) evening, flying a 50 hp Deperdussin. Flight (24.8.1912) noted that Jules Nardini also flew the Deperdussin at this meeting, and it was the same aircraft as Valentine had flown in the Circuit of Britain. Valentine entered the “Speed Handicap over four laps of the aerodrome… (there) were four competitors : A Blackburn (50 hp Gnome-GW-Farman) Lewis WF Turner (50 hp Gnome-Howard Wright), Marcel Desoutter (50 hp Gnome-Bleriot), and James Valentine (50 hp Gnome Deperdussin). Valentine was scratch, giving Desoutter 21 seconds start, Turner 2 minutes 30 seconds, and Blackburn 2 minutes 52 seconds. The finish was an impressive and close one, Valentine overhauling each of his rivals in fine style and finishing first, only overtaking Blackburn at the winning post : 

1.    James Valentine : 6 minutes 30 2/5 seconds (9 minutes 22 2/5 seconds handicap time)

2.    A Blackburn : 9 minutes 30 2/5 seconds (9 minutes 30 2/5 seconds handicap time)

3.    M Desoutter : 7 minutes 14 4/5 seconds ( 9 minutes 45 2/5 seconds handicap time)

4.    L Turner :  9 minutes 37 3/5 seconds (9 minutes 59 3/5 seconds handicap time)

(Flight 24.8.1912)

 

Valentine appeared again in the cross-country race at the second August Meeting at Hendon on Saturday(31 August). Again he piloted a Deperdussin, though now fitted with a 45 hp Anzani. Given a handicap of one minute and 15 seconds over scratch man G Sabelli in his 50 hp Gnome-Hanriot, Valentine was selected for the second heat. Desoutter (Bleriot) and Noel (Henry Farman) completed the field. “Noel managed to keep ahead and come in first (time, 7 minutes, 4 seconds) whilst Desoutter and Sabelli had a stiff fight for second lace 6 seconds behind, the former doing the trick by a bare ½ second, Valentine coming in third about 1 minute behind.” Thus Valentine was not in the final. (Flight 7.9.1912)

 

“The race from Dublin to Belfast started at Leopardstown on Saturday last (7 September), but, owing to the unsuitable weather, the competitors were unable to reach Belfast. Astley and Valentine both managed to get as far as Newry, a distance of about 60 miles, when the weather conditions prevented them from continuing the race. The Committee of the Irish Aero Club decided to divide the first prize of £300 between Mr HJD Astley and Mr James Valentine.” (Flight 14.9.1912)

 

The weather forecast from Belfast, received at 1:30 pm, reported that the weather was bad, with both rain and fog. Henri Salmet made a couple of circuits of the Leopardstown racecourse, but then it started to rain and a mist fell. “At 4:25 pm the weather was a little more propitious, and sle started on his Bleriot monoplane, followed by J Valentine on his 50 hp Deperdussin, Desmond Arthur on his 70 hp Bristol, and Lieutenant Porte on the 100 hp Deperdussin. Arthur failed to get clear of the ground,and in landing buckled one of his wheels. Lieutenant Porte found the conditions much too trying, and after going three miles, returned to Leopardstown. Astley and Valentine persevered through the vile weather, but conditions got worse rather tan better as they went on, while to add to their difficulties daylight began to fail. Eventually Valentine came down at Newry, while Astley gave up at Dogheda. It was ultimately decided by the authorities that the first prize of £300 should be divided between Messrs. Valentine and Astley, plus £40 each for expenses; the £50 Shell Motor Spirit prize, plus £40 for expenses, to go to Lieutenant Porte; and a special prize of £25, plus £40 for expenses, to Mr Arthur.” (Flight 14.9.1912)

 

“On the 11th inst.(Wednesday, 11 September) M Salmet visited the horse show at Lurgan, County Antrim, and gave an exhibition flight on his Bleriot. By way of consolation for the disappointment caused by the non-arrival of the competitors in the recent Dublin some very good flying by M. Salmet on his Bleriot, Mr Astley also on a Bleriot, and Mr Valentine on a Deperdussin. The flights were made fro the Balmoral Show ground, and the proceeds were devoted to Belfast charities.” (Flight 21.9.1912)

The success of the flights at the Balmoral Showground led Astley and Valentine to be engaged to make further flights on the following Saturday (21 September). “Mr Valentine was first up and gave a ten minutes’ exhibition on his Deperdussin, after which Mr Astley ascended… Mr Astley made some sharp turns, and in one of them apparently the machine sideslipped… and the monoplane crashed inside the track. Mr Astley received such injuries to the head through being pitched violently forward from his seat that he died two hours later… At the inquest on Monday the jury, after hearing the evidence of Mr Harry Delacombe, Manager for Messers Astley and Valentine at Belfast, and the medical evidence of Professor Sinclair, returned a verdict of ‘Accidental Death’, adding a rider to the effect that Mr Astley died in his efforts to save others by getting his machine clear of the spectators.” (Flight 28.9.1912)

Valentine decided to expand his appearances to an aerial tour of Ireland : “On Saturday week (5 October) Mr Valentine paid a visit to Powerscourt Castle, at the invitation of Lord Powerscourt, and gave an exhibition of flying, which attracted a large number of spectators from the surrounding country. Mr Valentine now proposes to go on a tour round Ireland, giving exhibitions en route wherever there are suitable grounds. It is probable this tour will include the following places : Mullinger, Cavan, Enniskillen, Sligo, Castlebarr, Galway, Limerick, Killarney, Cork, Waterford, Wexford and Drogheda.” (Flight 12.10.1912)  

 

“On Tuesday week (15 October) Mr Valentine was at Mulingar, and made a couple of exhibition flights on his Deperdussin from the Newbrook Racecourse. During the first, which was of about eight minutes’ duration, he flew around the town, while in the second he was over Lough Owel, about three miles from Mullingar.” (Flight 19.10.1912)

 

“On Thursday, of last week (17 October), Mr Valentine visited Castlebar with his Deperdussin monoplane and made a very good exhibition flight. Afterwards Mr Harry Delacombe, his manager, gave a dissertation upon the manipulation of the machine, which was greatly appreciated by a large audience, and then Mr Valentine put in another exhibition flight, finishing up with a circuit of the town.” (Flight 26.10.1912)

 

By 18 December, 1912, Valentine was at Buc in France. Miss Trehawke Davies, whom Valentine had piloted previously, was visiting to collect a new Bleriot monoplane she had just purchased. Perryon took her up in the first flight, after which Valentine piloted. (Flight 28.12.1912). A further flight over the surrounding countryside was recorded by Flight the following week (18.1.1913). “Mr Valentine (and) Miss Trehawke Davies started from Issy on Saturday (11 January) afternoon. On account of wind and mist it was decided to stop at Rouen, and on Sunday the journey to Dieppe was completed, the distance from Rouen to Dieppe being covered in 40 minutes. The machine was then dismantled and put on the cross-channel steamer.” (Flight 22.2.1913)

 

Miss Trehawke Davies entered her Bleriot for the first Hendon race meeting of 1913. Piloted by Valentine, they were handicapped at ‘scratch’ for the second heat of the speed contest. They came second, with a time of 8 minutes and 2 seconds, being beaten by Harold Blackburn, in a 50 hp Blackburn monoplane, with a time of 7 minutes and 49 seconds.

 

The Bleriot was scratch in the final also, starting 3 minutes 20 seconds after Blackburn, 1 minute 34 seconds after Verrier (70 hp Renault Maurice Farman) and 38 seconds after Richet (110 hp Canton-Unne Breguet). “Although spread out at first, the machines soon began to draw together, and several exciting ‘passes’ were made. Valentine, with his passenger effectively ‘streamlined’, cut the pylons very close, as did Richet, who banked his machine, when turning, in an alarming manner. It won him the race – and the Aero Show trophy – however, and a stiff tussle for second place ensued between Verrier and Blackburn, the former obtaining it by a bare four-fifths of a second. Valentine came in a little over one second behind.” (Flight 1.3.1913). Valentine’s time, for fourth and last place, was 15 minutes and 14 seconds, giving a handicap time of 11 minutes and 54 seconds.

 

In February, the Royal Aero Club issued a challenge to the Aero Club of France to compete for the Gordon Bennett Aviation Cup at Bethany, near Rheims, on 27 September, 1913. Valentine registered his entry, together with Gustav Hamel and the British & Colonial Aeroplane Company Limited (Bristols). Each was to enter a single aircraft.

 

On Tuesday (4 March), “In the afternoon J Valentine came to the London Aerodrome, and a private match was arranged to be run there and then between M Brindejonc de Moulinais on the (80 hp) Morane-Saulnier, J Valentine on his 70hp tandem Bleriot, and RT Gates on the Grahame-White ‘bus 1 ½ laps in 4. The result was an easy win for Brindejonc ” (Flight 8.3.1913)

Valentine attended the Royal Aero Club dinner at the Royal Automobile Club in March, 1913.

Valentine did not enter for the 1913 Giesler Challenge Trophy, although he was the current holder.  M Brindejonc de Moulinais won this race also, establishing the Morane monoplane as the racer to beat. Deperdussins, entered by Porte and Nardini, failed to finish.

Valentine borrowed Nardini’s Deperdussin to give a 15 minute exhibition flight at Hendon during the Empire Day Meeting on Saturday (24 May) (Flight 31.5.1913)

 

Monday last week (2 June), according to Flight 7.6.113, a 50,000 cubic feet spherical balloon of the Willows School took over from Hendon and landed at South Lodge, Enfield, an hour later. Valentine joined the balloon at Enfield, and took off from there at 7:00 pm with Captain LL Atherton piloting. The balloon came down at 8:30 am at Nazeing, in Essex, where it was tethered down until midnight. Willows and Atherton ascended again at 12:30 am, without Valentine, and came down near Chelmsford at 6:30 am. The balloon was then packed up and returned to Hendon by road. 

 

“On Tuesday last (10 June), in London, Mr James Valentine, the well-known aviator, was married to Miss Eileen Knox, only daughter of the late Major-General GW Knox CB, and Lady Sybil Knox. Miss Knox is a niece of Lord Lonsdale”. (Flight 14.6.1913)

Valentine took an opportunity to make a flight in Salmet’s 80 hp Daily Mail Bleriot XI-2 at Hendon’s meeting on Saturday 18 Ocober. (Flight 25.10.1913)

 

Attended first London Aerodrome dinner at Royal Automobile Club on 20 March 1914.

Valentine made a flight in Miss Trehawke Davies’ 80 hp Bleriot XI-2 at the London Aerodrome Saturday meeting on 21 March 1913.

 

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Thomas Guinan Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 25 Feb 2013 at 17:01

“Valentine is now a Captain and I think rather on his dignity, as he told me at lunch that he had been having a lot of trouble with the navy as he could not get the naval man here to acknowledge his superiority ! Today, I fancy, a crisis was reached owing to a naval lieutenant proposing to go and see General Hirchauer, the French directo fof aviation, on a matter of business, without first consulting our friend V, who, he tells me, is ‘in charge’ here, and so should have been approached first, or some such rubbish. He was quite amusing.” 2nd Lieutenant D Corbett Wilson, 3 Squadron, 6 February, 1915

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Thomas Guinan Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 25 Feb 2013 at 17:04

“I came down in a motor (to Paris) with Valentine, who is a sort of general supervisor of the aircraft Park, that’s the base, he buys spares etc. He has a very nice motor provided for him and we came down in great comfort.” 2nd Lieutenant D Corbett Wilson, 29 October, 1914, had learned to fly at Pau at the same time as James Valentine, who he thought of as ‘bumptious’.

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote NickForder Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18 Mar 2013 at 16:58

Valentine remained in post until 15 October, 1915, when he was regraded from Equipment Officer to Flight Commander. He was made a Chevalier of the Legion d’Honneur in recognition of his services to the French Government (LG 8.11.1915).

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote NickForder Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18 Mar 2013 at 17:16

Captain RE Innes-Ker, Irish Guards Special Reserve, was posted in to replace Valentine in Paris, having served previously as an RFC Wing Adjutant. Does anyone know which wing Innes-Ker was serving with ?

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote NickForder Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 18 Mar 2013 at 17:56
"On the 13th (August, 1915) Valentine drove me back from Paris in his racing Panhard. We left Paris at 4:15, and we arrived at St Omer at 7:20. Valentine drove at terrific speed, but with consummate skill. He would calculate accurately what a man in a cart about three-quarters of a mile ahead would be likely to do... and not give him time to do it." Maurice Baring, 'Flying Corps Headquarters'.
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