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100 Squadron

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NickForder View Drop Down
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    Posted: 28 Jan 2010 at 09:08
This month being the centenary of the foundation of AV Roe & Co (there is now a plaque on Brownsfield Mill, the first factory building - I will send Andy photos for the website !), I was reminded that Humphrey Verdon-Roe (AV Roe's brother) resigned from the company in 1917 and joined the RFC. He served with 100 Squadron as an observer and, according to 'The Annals of 100 Squadron', was WIA.
 
Has anyone researched 100 Squadron and can shed any light on HV's service ?
 
Many thanks
Nick
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Paul R Hare Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 28 Jan 2010 at 18:31
All I know is that they flew F.E.2bs on night bombing raids.
Paul.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote NickForder Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02 Feb 2010 at 10:10
According to THE LIFE OF MARIE STOPES, by Keith Briant (York, 1962) : "Humphrey Roe had his taste of night bombing over the German lines, when engine failure involved him in an accident as a result of which he received a broken ankle and a jarred spine. The doctors recommended that he should be invalided home. On March 24th (1918) he wrote her a letter on the ambulance train from the coast to London telling her that he was on his way to an Officers' Hospital in Hampstead. He said he would be delighted if she would visit him 'the sooner the more delight'. She visited him on the 26th and suggested that perhaps he might like to try to get leave to convalesce at her house at Leatherhead. As he seemed very much to like the idea, she devised an ingenious plan to extricate him from the Flying Corps Hospital where it was impossible to secure any privacy. On April 4th she wrote to him and enclosed a letter from her which he was to give to the Commanding Officer of the Hospital.  University of London writing paper. She headed it: 'Private address: Craigvara, Leatherhead.' It read: *Dr Stopes' compliments to the Commanding Officer, R.F.C. Officers* Hospital, Hampstead: Now that Lieut. H. V. Roe is making good progress, Dr Stopes begs to suggest that a few days in the sunny open air of Leatherhead (perhaps over this week-end) might assist in his recovery. Dr Stopes undertakes that Lieut. Roe will lead a strictly disciplined life, be out of doors all day, go to bed early and touch no alcohol if the short leave is granted him to visit Dr Stopes' private house in Leatherhead.  Humphrey Roe was delighted and he at once replied: 'Dear Miss Stopes, I received your letter on my return this evening. I was much amused at the severe crusted old doctor talking about making me lead a strictly sober and disciplined life. Shall I tell the C.O. that the Doctor is a decent sort of a fellow but rather old, that he and my father used to go to school together, therefore the old Doctor wants to help me?  'Of course he may know you by name and the game would be up. Did I ever mention my friend MacAhster? He is a geologist. ... I mentioned you and he writes back saying he knows you by name but it can hardly be you by the way in which I referred to you and that it was possibly your mother who wrote the articles on Coal in Japan and contributed articles to the Quarterly, etc. I was awfully tickled and will write to him that you are not the German frau kind of person I also thought you were. . . . Tomorrow I shall see what the C.O. has to say about the Doctor's letter. What fun if it comes off! Yours very sincerely, Humphrey V. Roe/ 
 It did not come off and he told her: 'I received a definite NO ! ! They agreed it was rot but the C.O. reminded me that other C.O.s have lost their jobs for giving leave. If one is well enough to go to Leatherhead, I should be out of here. "Very sorry, my lad," he said, "but I must not grant the leave'*, so I went off with tears in my eyes and put your letter in my pocket/ 
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NickForder View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote NickForder Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 02 Feb 2010 at 10:15
Annals of 100 Squadron notes a single raid that Humphrey Verdon Roe was involved with. This was on the night of 6/7 March 1918, when a single FE2b took off to biomb Frescaty aerodrome. 1 x 230 lb, 1 x 40 lb and 5 x 25 lb bombs were dropped, with unknown results. Apparantly the Germans reported that one shed was completely burned out. All machines destroyed. Considerable damage.
 
Roe's pilot was Lieutenant (Late Captain DFC) FT 'Bright Eyes' Bright, Angel Hill, Bury St Edmunds, Suffolk.
 
Roe's address is given as 10 Oakhill Road, Putney, London SW - presumably the address of his brother, in whose stables AV Roe built his first aircraft ?
 
Following Roe's accident he was retained on HE, and spent the remainde rof the war 'lecturing'.
Nick
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