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Blackburn bomb sight.

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    Posted: 23 Feb 2016 at 16:32

26 July 1915. Bomb dropping.  On the 26th inst. (26 July 1915). Captain Hubbard (3 Squadron), on a Morane, obtained a direct hit with a 20-pound Hale bomb from a height of 7,000 feet on a house at T.30.b.=7, Sheet 36. Captain Hubbard was using a Blackburn bomb sight.

Anyone know anything more about the Blackburn bombsight ?


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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote KK Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 26 Feb 2016 at 16:34
Do you think this was Blackburn the company or Blackburn an airman?
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote NickForder Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 24 Jun 2016 at 13:54
Harold Blackburn received the Military Cross[14] and also designed a bombsight which 2nd Lieutenant Cedric Waters Hill successfully used to destroy the water tank of the remote Turkish outpost at Bir el Hassana on 26 February 1916.[15] 
  1.  The London Gazette(Supplement) no. 29438. p. 577. 14 January 1916. Retrieved 27 August 2012.
  2. Jump up^ Orange, Dr Vincent & Stapleton, D. Winged Promises:History of No.14 Squadron, RAF 1915–1945. pp. 4–6. ISBN 1-899808-45-0
  3. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Harold_Blackburn
  4. "The many friends of Mr. Harold Blackburn, who is serving with the R.F.C., will be pleased to hear that he is well and, judging by a letter sent to his brother at Doncaster, happy. Following is an extract of his letter:— " I came back to the camp on Friday, having been away three days getting a new machine. I did a reconnaissance yesterday  (Sunday), also sat in a field close to a village which was suffering tremendous bombardment by the German guns.  Occasional misdirected shells burst close to where I sat, and the shells from our own batteries behind were whistling overhead. The positions we are operating against now seem almost as difficult as those we were hammering at on the Aisne. Part of the time I sat there I watched a fight between one of our aeroplanes and one belonging to the enemy, and heard the shots distinctly. At about the same time there was a nice little concert in camp here. Two Taubes came over just after church parade. Our firing party turned out with rifles, our automatic guns rattled, and our  anti-aircraft got to work. The dogs barked, alarm bells rang, and there was no end of a beano. We are all considerably interested to see what kind of orders we shall get the first time a Taube comes over during church service. I had a few shells from the German anti-aircraft gun yesterday ; but he made very rotten practice, and I came home to our chateau to a good dinner and a novel in front of a good fire. I am always nervous till we have had the first shell, then I don't mind, and positively chuckle with satisfaction when they time their fire badly and the shells burst well above us. The only time we clear out for shell fire is when flying slowly up wind. To stay under these circumstances is simply asking for it, so we don't wait." Flight 20.12.1914
"The following extract is from a letter written to his brother at Doncaster by Mr. Harold Blackburn, who is now on active service :— " My two chases after the German aeroplanes were quite exciting, and I'm just longing for another chance. I was very lucky in getting a long reconnaissance on Wednesday—three hours and five minutes, and covering about 140 miles—locating the German reserves. A Taube machine came over a few minutes ago—the second one I have seen near the camp—but he disappeared without coming nearer than about four miles, and it was just dusk. Last night, after writing the above, another Taube came over, and we witnessed a splendid running fight for several miles. You should have seen the circling and daring and manoeuvring for firing positions. It was awfully exciting. We could hear the shots, and expected one of the craft to come down any minute, but they disappeared, still fighting. The captain returned in about twenty minutes with three of his wing spars shot through, saying, 'The German escaped,' but we heard late last night that a German machine had come down in flames a few miles away— doubtless the same one.  I flew over yesterday during a two hours' flight, and the town seems to be evacuated and partly on fire. It's a big manufacturing town, and the strangest sight on earth to see a place like that deserted." Flight 6.11.1914
 
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